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North Point Egg Wafflets @ Jordan, Hong Kong

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Next to egg tarts, egg wafflets are a must every visit. I am literally led by my nose to the exact spot of this hole in wall stall, sniffing my way to it.

Hi there, delicious.

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Peeled off the hot iron cast pan, these egg wafflets are DELICIOUS. Crispy with hollow centers but I love the batter.

The great thing about these street snacks is, they are so dangerously addictive I actually finished it just walking around St Andrews Cathedral a short distance from this stall.

North Point Egg Wafflets
Jordan MTR

Tai Cheong @ Tsing Yi Station, Hong Kong

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Tai Cheong has a special place in my heart, so much so, every single time I visit Hong Kong I make space for their famous signatures.

The humble egg tart. This time round, I had my eye on another of their lesser known yet wildly popular 莎翁, not related to Shakespeare whatsoever.

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A chinese donut I say with a sugar dusted pastry in hand.

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The pockets of air make this a very light pastry and tastes like the diet version of french toast without any of the density. The eggy taste is pleasant as well.

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Gluttony would have it when the lady was promoting her "Buy 2 get 1 free" promotion. Resolute wavered and I ended up with 1 莎翁 and 2 of their lardy egg tarts. Fat die me, indeed.

Tai Cheong
Tsing Yi Station 

Jenny Bakery @ Sheung Wan, Hong Kong

Jenny's Cookies have been THE souvenir to lug back and infact has been promoted by every other guide available that results in the neverending queues. On a good day I was told, the queue is about an hour, and on a ridiculously bad day it can last anytime longer.

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Lady luck must be shining tremendously on me that one Sunday when the girlfriend brought me there and there was no queue. ZERO.

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Shutters were half down and the lady had a finger on the shut button when we scurried up. She had let another lady before me out of the shop with their famous cookies. We pleaded with her and I managed to walk out victoriously with two tins. By the way, they limit each customer to just two tins. The person after me was flatly refused and boy, did that add to my smug grin.

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These cookies come in tins that change their designs every now and then. So what is the fuss many will ask?

I had mine in 4 mix (HKD 130), there is a version with 8 mix and seasonal delights include pineapple tarts and almond flakes. A whiff of the buttery fragrance made me dizzy with happiness.

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One has to be a butter fan to enjoy this, otherwise ignore the queues and fuss.  In the 4 mix I have butter cookies, coffee cookies and raisin cookies. I enjoyed the flower designed ones best, melt in the mouth and so addictive.

Be warned that there are fake shops around peddaling these so just stick to the below mentioned two official shops for your Jenny goodies.

Jenny Bakery
Tsim Sha Tsui: Shop 24 Ground Floor, Mirador Mansion,54-64 Nathan Road.
Sheung Wan: 15 Wing Wo Street, Ground Floor.

Sun Kee Restaurant @ Burrows Street, Hong Kong

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The journey to track down this second outlet of Sun Kee was not an easy one. First it started with the trusty Openrice giving me a wrong address, and I circled the previous address relentlessly even after the building security guard confirmed there was no such outlet before I finally stumbled upon it a few streets nearby.

Relatively empty on a Tuesday morning, I have the HK dining culture to thank for, granting me a solo diner an experience that was hardly awkward or embarrassing. Infact, we were all loner diners and I felt completely at home.

The menu can get confusing but the waiters were kind enough to advise on more value for money sets. I ordered a breakfast set (HKD 42) which comprised of a beverage and the pork neck cheese noodle.

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Milk Tea in a silver mug, there is just something about the stocking milk tea in Hong Kong that is so different from our Teh-C.

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The famous pork neck cheese noodle.

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The cream cheese sauce was light and hardly cloying, instant noodles cooked a tad soft and the grilled pork neck was a chewy meaty delight. With the 1001 ways to eat instant noodles, I have found a favourite.

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Pork neck meat has been a favourite at Thai Restaurants and they ingeniously incorporated this into a noodle dish.

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They even do deliveries! How lucky, you Hongkongers.

I wish I had more space for their cheese balls and just an extra order of grilled pork neck.

Sun Kee Restaurant
G/F., 3 Burrows Street

Upper House @ Sheung Wan, Hong Kong

The dining scene in Hong Kong is so vibrant and consumers are seemingly more willing to splash out on meals - for that, I am always willing to make a trip there so very often. Fact is, a fair number of dining establishments choose Hong Kong as their first foray into Asia before expanding to Singapore.

Anyhow my point being, their food and beverage industry is so well advanced that it surprises me (still) that a handful of them choose to pull their shutters on a Sunday dinner. And I thought that only the Italian and French needed their sabbaths - it took us two restaurants later to finally get one that decided Sunday was the day for their cash registers to ring. 



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Upper Modern Bistro is opened by the protégé of French chef Pierre Gagnaire and former executive chef at Hullet House’s St George restaurant - Chef Philippe Orrico.

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Bar counter that came alive at night.

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Bread that was literally served in a cloth basket and they were truly delicious - crusty edges and pillowy insides slapped with butter - the simple delights.

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Fish Market Ceviche  (HKD 168)
Octopus, Guacamole

One of those ceviche dishes that actually have equal ratios of vegetables and seafood. Flavours were exquisite, octopus incredibly tender and move over chicken ceasar salad, this is the new salad to love.

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Foie Gras Creme Brulee (HKD 98)
Poppy Seed

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Savoury creme brulee has to be one of its kind with the luxurious foie gras as the main star. Wobbly smooth like the sweet creme brulee would be, this even comes with a torched crust and the difference lies in the rich foie gras mousse.

Brilliant, and only more.

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Crispy Sole (HKD 368)
Crab Meat, Baby Spinach, Smoked Eel

Possibly the best fried fish dish eaten, so simple yet impeccably done.

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A side of vegetables that once again look too beautiful to eat.


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Green Salad (HKD 68)

More of the green movement, I would have preferred by now that they use different vegetables instead of the same throughout. It can get boring.

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Lobster Mac and Cheese (HKD 298)

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Lo and behold the most extravagant macaroni and cheese eaten. Thumbs up for the succulent and generous lobster chunks, I can very well give up eating lobster rolls for this.

Creamy, chewy and just so decadent.

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Warm Chocolate Cake (HKD 128)
Hazelnut Icecream

First, Upper House does provide a birthday cake at a charge of HKD 128 if advance notice is given.
Secondly, we did not give that advance notice so the best they could do was to attach a birthday tag and pass it off as a birthday cake and still charge us for us anyway.

These mini chocolate cakes were divine though, melty centers within a rich cake,

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The hazelnut icecream was equally indulgent.

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Pistachio Barre (HKD 108)
Green Apple Sorbet, Candies, Popcorn

Beautifully plated, this layered mousse cake was excellent. Great with apple sorbet and the sweet touches that gave this smooth one lots of texture.

Casual bistro with creative dishes, I will not say the service was over the top impressive. At least my night ended on a delicious note.

Upper House
 6-14 Upper Station Street, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong

Dead End Cafe @ Hong Kong

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Tai Ping Yang Street was an area that I was checking out and stumbled upon this cafe very aptly called Dead End Cafe. Fair enough there was nothing beyond it and being on a hill, this could not have been better named.

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Menu cheats that made us rethink the fuss that most of the cafes locally engage in when it could really be as simple as printing on receipt paper.

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All I could stomach was a ginger lemonade and it was truly comforting.

I loved the vibe of the place - it could accomodate the busyness of working executives taking away gourmet sandwiches (yes I wish I had space for that), the tranquility of the weekend crowd and dogs (we spotted 2 gorgeous huskies and a barkish terrior that somehow fitted in beautifully) and then an occasional cafe hopper.

In short, I cannot wait to be back in this neighbourhood.

Psst, Po's Atelier is just next door churning out French Japanese artisanal bakes.

Dead End Cafe
72 Po Hing Fong

Starbucks x G.O.D. @ Duddell Street, Hong Kong

I am a hardcore G.O.D. fan since day one and as much as I wish my house was mostly furnished by the label, it was not the case. The collaboration between Starbucks and G.O.D. has become a touristy hangout in Central area and I finally checked it out after so many missed attempts.

This 2012 tie up is the world’s first Starbucks coffee shop that departs radically form their signature interior design. The style is based on Hong Kong-style snack houses from the 1960s with a twist.

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Menus written in chinese and on acryllic panels that are a thing of the past.

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A television of this size is unheard of in my generation but this would bring back huge memories for the parents.

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Going further back in time with handwritten menu cards.

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I personally adore the nostalgic touches and having a backdrop like this does create that atmosphere. Now, I just need to change my hairdo and attire to fit into the past.

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A wedding couple going back in time! A tip though, they should've donned traditional outfits to fit into that era.

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Red Bean Clay Pot Pudding (HKD 13)

The outcome of the collaboration was so impressive that Starbucks even change some of the items on their menu to go with the interior! Llimited edition G.O.D. x Starbucks products are available in store. 

This red bean clay pot pudding is one of them. Fondly known as "putt zai gou" to me, the translation does get me rolling over in amusement. Miles off from the real deal, this was close to the peranakan kueh texture and density. A modern take on a treat of the past - all in, my curiosity is satisfied.

A second store is already available in Mong Kok and a return to Hong Kong soonish is a must for more of these charming collaborations!

Starbucks + Bing Sutt Concept
Shop M2, Mezzanine Floor
Baskerville House
13 Duddell Street, Central